UNDERCUTTING RIGHTS : Human rights and enviromental due diligence in the tropical forestry sector

Sustainable management of the world’s tropical forests is critical for the achievement of goals outlined in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, specifically as regards reducing poverty for the 1.6 billion people who rely on forests for their livelihoods, and for ensuring global climate stability. However, global efforts to address deforestation and degradation are falling short of the challenge and tropical forests are disappearing at an unprecedented rate. Logging is the second largest contributor to the ongoing disappearance of forests and biodiversity after forest clearing for agricultural expansion.
This report investigates human rights and livelihood impacts associated with deforestation and logging, and the extent of community benefits derived from forestry operations. It presents a case study from Cameroon, host to 10 percent of the Congo Basin forests on which 75 million people, including nearly 15013 distinct ethnic groups and indigenous peoples, depend for their livelihoods and cultures. The Congo Basin – the second-largest tropical forest in the world after the Amazon – is expected to lose 70 percent of its remaining forest cover by 2040 unless current patterns of infrastructure development and natural resource exploitation are curbed.

Download the report here : UNDERCUTTING RIGHTS : Human rights and enviromental due diligence in the tropical forestry sector.